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Interview for Degree Show Catalogue, Leeds University (page 13 – 15)

What is Drawing For? Loughborough University Drawing Journal. An essay by Elizabeth Murton

Core Gallery Interview Series by Chantelle Purcell, A Theory of Everything Exhibition

Statement
Murton’s practice explores what we know, perceive and define, and what we can’t. The artist engages with external agents, be that specialists, participants, cross-disciplinary ideas, processes or materials to create the work through installation, sculpture and mark making. Cross–disciplinary work has included responding to conversations with experts in psychology (Not to Scale, 2011) and quantum physics (Quantum Communication Through a Spin Chain, 2011).

Paying no heed to the traditional divisions between art and craft, the artist often re-purposes textile processes such as using tin cans as giant beads (Can, 2010), or weaving sculptures with paper or tent poles (The Playing Frame, 2006; Indevelopment, 2007; Role, 2013) and most recently abstracting shibori techniques through film to suggest bodily processes (Synaptic Cleft, 2015) . The work often has a ‘truth to materials’ aesthetic, revealing components and construction, and collaborating with these (often non-fine art) materials to create form. The work strives for Japanese shibumi, an unobtrusive restrained aesthetic with subtle details: balancing simplicity with complexity.

As we find in many ecologies, there is a fine line between order and randomness; thinking we understand and have control, and realising we don’t. Repetition and pattern is a recurring starting point for the artist, often referencing the grid/graph structure of woven cloth contrasted with expressive or interrupting lines, (Unroll, 2013; Untitled (Green Net) 2015). Across the artist’s practice, there is the sense of capturing a moment or manifestation in a chain of events. Perhaps where the calm exists between the simple and complex, and weaving in and out of the macro and micro material world around us.